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in Life & Leisure, Mind & Body

How To Have Fun and Stay Safe in the Sun

  • March 1, 2018
  • By 50 Shades
  • 22 Comments
How To Have Fun and Stay Safe in the Sun

Summer’s over but we still need to know how to have fun and stay safe in the sun!

We have just experienced a sizzling summer here in Australia, with high daily temperatures and UV ratings to match. But Australia’s long love affair with the beach has taken its toll: bronzed Aussies now have one of the highest rates of skin cancer in the world.

Usually caused by excessive exposure to the sun and UV radiation, skin cancer is responsible for more deaths than traffic accidents in Australia each year.

know how to have fun and stay safe in the sun

Sunbathing is risky business

According to the latest data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, more than 2,200 Australians died from this almost entirely preventable disease in 2013. Nearly one in three (32.6%) Australians living with cancer in 2011-12 had skin cancer, making it the most common form of cancer. At least two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer before the age of 70, with the risk increasing for men, who are also more likely to die from the disease.

Melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in males (after prostate and bowel cancer) and females (after breast and bowel cancer) in Australia. Australian women have a one in 24 chance of being diagnosed with melanoma before the age of 85, with the risk increasing to one in 14 for men.

Within Australia, people in Queensland face the highest risk of developing melanoma, followed by Western Australia, New South Wales, Tasmania, Australian Capital Territory, Victoria, South Australia, and Northern Territory.

know how to have fun and stay safe in the sun

Will these statistics change?

Attitudes towards the Aussie sun are definitely changing. Peeling noses and blistered backs used to be a rite-of-passage for kids growing up in Australia – these repeated episodes of sun exposure and burning in childhood were found to be a major contributing factor to the likelihood of developing skin cancer later in life.

These days, fortunately, most young Australians are likely to be covered up in neck-to-knee lycra for their first trip to the beach. It is much less common for kids to get such harsh sunburn.

Educational campaigns emphasising the importance of slipping on a shirt, slopping on some sunscreen, slapping on a hat, seeking out shade and sliding on a pair of sunglasses have helped effect a generational shift, with attitudes to tanning and sun exposure much changed.

In fact, skin cancer rates are now dropping among young Australians – with a 10% drop in non-melanoma skin cancers between 2000 and 2010 for Australians under 45. Good news for our younger generation; although the risk is still high, with skin cancers affecting about 400,000 Australians each year.

know how to have fun and stay safe in the sun

Life and Trauma cover for peace of mind

Given the high prevalence of skin cancers in Australia, it could be a good idea to take out Life Insurance for peace of mind that, if the worst were to happen, your family will be taken care of.

Trauma Cover could be a worthwhile addition to your Life Insurance. If you were to be diagnosed with cancer you could receive a lump-sum payment of up to $2 million, which could provide financial peace of mind while you are focused on your recovery.

Talk to our Insurance Specialists to obtain a quote for the cover that best suits your Life Insurance needs.

Sources: http://wiki.cancer.org.au/skincancerstats/Skin_cancer_incidence_and_mortality
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-04-03/skin-cancer-rates-fall-for-young-australians-researchers-say/5364648

I am really happy to work with our sponsor, NobleOak Life Limited, today to share this crucial information with you!

This post is part of the Lovin’ Life Linky with a Lovin’ Life Team of the “ageing positively” kind who are as keen as I am to promote the Lovin’ Life mindset.

The Lovin’ Life Team includes:

Lyndall from Seize the Day Project
Deb from DebbishDotCom
Min from Write of the Middle.
Leanne from Deep Fried Fruit
and of course me, Kathy from 50 Shades of Age


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By 50 Shades, March 1, 2018 Kathy was a 50 something year old when she started up this blog 6 years ago, but has since turned over another decade and is now in her early 60s. She is married with two adult children and lives on the Tweed Coast of New South Wales, Australia. Kathy enjoys living life to the fullest and loves to keep fit and active by maintaining a healthy diet and exercising regularly. Some of her interests include reading, photography, travelling, cooking and blogging! Kathy works part-time as a freelance writer but her real passion is travelling and photographing brilliant destinations both within Australia and overseas and writing about it.
  • 22

50 Shades

Kathy was a 50 something year old when she started up this blog 6 years ago, but has since turned over another decade and is now in her early 60s. She is married with two adult children and lives on the Tweed Coast of New South Wales, Australia. Kathy enjoys living life to the fullest and loves to keep fit and active by maintaining a healthy diet and exercising regularly. Some of her interests include reading, photography, travelling, cooking and blogging! Kathy works part-time as a freelance writer but her real passion is travelling and photographing brilliant destinations both within Australia and overseas and writing about it.

Browsing Byron Bay
22 Comments
  • Sue from Sizzling Towards 60 & Beyond
    March 1, 2018

    Hi Kathy things have certainly changed in attitude to being more Sun Smart haven’t they? I remember laying for hours covered in baby oil to get the ‘tan’ but usually was more like a lobster! When I drop my grandson to kindy they have a sunscreen table where we have to put sunscreen on before they enter kindy and it is a ‘No Hat, No Play’ policy. Thanks for the reminder and life insurance is also a good idea and something we just don’t think about really.

    • Kathy
      March 2, 2018

      I think our generation all did the baby oil sunbaking thing and most of us have sun damaged skin or skin cancers as a consequence. I wish I’d been much more sun savvy. I think it’s great that kids are being educated and protected against the sun these days. It is heartening to see skin cancer statistics are on the decline. #TeamLovinLife

  • Jo Tracey
    March 1, 2018

    Things certainly have changed – and for the better! With all the education, it’s good news that skin cancer rates are dropping in the young. Sadly I think many of us did all the damage to our skin when we were young.

    • Kathy
      March 2, 2018

      I agree Jo.The damage has been done in our case, but at least my kids have been educated to “slip, slop, slap”. They are both very good when it comes to sun protection.

  • Jodie
    March 1, 2018

    I used to be a huge sun bather, and I’m paying for it now. So now we try to be so, so careful. In fact, I’m thinking of buying a sun shirt so I don’t always have to rely on sunscreen!!
    XOOX
    Jodie
    http://www.jtouchofstyle.com

    • Kathy
      March 2, 2018

      Yes Jodie I sometimes like to wear a sun shirt or rashie, rather than put on sunscreen. I never leave my house without at least sunscreen on my face and usually wear a sunhat. #TeamLovinLife

  • Min@WriteoftheMiddle
    March 1, 2018

    Such an important message Kathy! I fear that it is most likely that I will suffer the consequences of many, many years of worshipping the sun. We didn’t know the dangers quite so much back then. #TeamLovinLife

    • Kathy
      March 2, 2018

      It is a very important message and I’m glad I had the opportunity to post this article. I have already had a BCC cut out of my nose and now have to have regular skin checkups. But I notice I’m getting a lot of freckles and brown blemishes (maybe age spots) on my skin!

  • Leanne | www.crestingthehill.com.au
    March 1, 2018

    I wish we’d been more aware of sun safety when we were kids – my skin has suffered from all those years of sunburn and peeling. Fortunately we were onto it by the time we had kids and they have never had the exposure to the sun that we did – lots of sunscreen and hats – definitely insurance for the future (and I’m never without a hat and covering up these days).

    • Kathy
      March 2, 2018

      Don’t we ever Leanne. I can’t believe how foolish I was in my youth with sun protection. But like you say, at least we got the message through to our children and they will in turn protect their little ones from the sun. #TeamLovinLife

  • Jan Wild
    March 1, 2018

    As a member of the baby oil generation it is great to know that the statistics are improving. It’s nice to be brown but not at the cost of our health.

    • Kathy
      March 2, 2018

      Yes you and dozens of others by the sound of it were baby oil sunbakers! I’m very cautious now when I go out into the Queensland harsh sun. I always wear sunscreen on my face and usually a sunhat. I tend to brown easily because of all the walking I do, but I certainly don’t sunbake any more. #TeamLovinLife

  • Lyndall @ SeizeThe Day Project
    March 1, 2018

    My skin is milky white and I just can’t get a tan – I go red and peel instead – so sunbathing isn’t really on my agenda. Having said that, I have still managed to acquire quite a few skin cancers over the years, which have swiftly been removed. Having lost my Dad to melanoma, I’m back to at the doctor every six months for a skin check :) x #TeamLovinLife

    • Kathy
      March 2, 2018

      I can understand your hesitation in getting a tan Lyndall. We also lost a good friend 2 years ago to Melanoma and it was a big lesson to all of us. Even if you have olive skin you are still prone to skin cancer, so we all need to protect ourselves against the harsh Queensland sun.

  • Janet
    March 1, 2018

    I’m paying the price now for our sun loving childhood – had a BCC removed from my face just yesterday (ouch!). But we’ve definitely learned a thing or two – my (now grown) children have never blistered or peeled, unlike as young uns!

    • Kathy
      March 2, 2018

      Oh yes I noticed you had something removed Janet. I had one cut out of my nose around 7 years ago and have to be very careful now. We are all a lot more sun savvy these days, thank goodness. #TeamLovinLife

  • Jo
    March 1, 2018

    Such an important reminder Kathy – I also had a misspent sunny youth – well we didn’t know any better then. I’m a little bit over the top these days about suncream and cover ups but it’s really necessary until someone can stitch up and repair the ozone layer!

    • Kathy
      March 2, 2018

      It is an important reminder Jo. We all need to cover up more and forget about the concept of having a suntan to look good. I notice the current generation tend to worry less about tanning and use sun protection a lot more. #TeamLovinLife

  • Nikki@Wonderfully Women
    March 1, 2018

    One of the true downfalls of living in Australia, but thankfully we have great sunscreens that are no doubt the most important thing we can use when we head outside.

    • Kathy
      March 2, 2018

      Yes our UV rays are intense compared to countries in the Northern Hemisphere. I think the “slip, slop, slap” message is finally getting through. #TeamLovinLife

  • Leanne @ Deep Fried Fruit
    March 3, 2018

    Such important info! I was one of those teens that covered myself in baby oil. Holy crap. Thank goodness we get wiser! #teamlovinlife

    • Kathy
      March 3, 2018

      Yes it is a relief that we have all finally realised how damaging the sun can be. I generally don’t sunbake and normally cover up or wear sunscreen when I’m exposed for long lengths of time.

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