Spread the love
" />
Back to home
in Mind & Body

Giving up the ‘Bad Stuff’

  • September 8, 2015
  • By 50 Shades
  • 20 Comments
Giving up the ‘Bad Stuff’

Tempted-Bulldog

I consider myself to be a fairly healthy person who exercises and watches her diet diligently, but never seems to achieve that “spring out of bed”, feeling wonderful, of a morning. There is so much information out there about what we should and shouldn’t eat and how much and what types of exercise we should be undertaking. So much so that it was doing my head in!

Over the years I have tried particular diets, under the supervision of a Naturopath, as I do have a tendency to feel bloated and just plain yucky in the tummy. I have tried eliminating dairy and gluten from my diet. I have tried the low fat diet, the low carb diet, the high protein diet, the soup diet and the juicing diet. However I never realised that the number one ‘bad stuff’ in my diet was the amount of sugar I was consuming.

Fact: Sugar is a carbohydrate and provides a source of energy. Sugar can take many forms including white, raw or brown sugar, honey or corn syrup. Too much sugar in the diet can contribute to health problems including obesity and tooth decay. Sugars are popular in the processed food industry because they add taste, colour, bulk and thickness to food products.

In what was a life-changing event for me, I watched a movie on the flight back from the USA a few months ago, called “That Sugar Film”. It was like a lightbulb moment for me. I had no idea that everyday so-called healthy foods were so full of sugar! We have been very cleverly convinced that foods such as breakfast cereals, breads, fruit juices, low-fat yoghurts and muesli bars are good for us. But these foods have so much added sugar.

thatsugarfilm_fb

So immediately when I returned home I chucked out the muesli, the low-fat yoghurt, the low-fat cheese and the fruit juice. I started researching what foods I could replace these with and basically it narrowed down to full-fat everything, plain old oats for breakfast, sour dough bread, nuts like almonds and pistachios and a few select fruits like kiwi fruit, blueberries and cantelope. I started devouring delicious creamy yoghurt, cheese, full cream milk, eggs, chicken with the skin on, loads of veggies and big handfuls of almonds.

What I noticed immediately was that my tummy was no longer bloated and nor did I suffer from uncomfortable tummy rumblings and flatulence. I started to feel better in the mornings and my brain fog lifted. I was feeling more energetic and clear headed, able to think more laterally and make decisions. I was like a whole new me!

The ‘quit sugar’ diet initially is fairly drastic. For the first 8 weeks of the detox phase you give up almost every food you ever loved. No fruit, No bread or cereals, No pasta, No potatoes, No rice, No biscuits, No cakes (unless gluten and sugar free), No fruit juice, No sweets or chocolate and No wine (ouch!). To top things off No Diet Coke or artificial sweeteners at all!

sugar

My diet consisted of lots of eggs, chicken, fish, veggies, salads, nuts, cheeses and veggie soup. However I did weaken with the wine after a few weeks and limited myself to the occasional glass. It was difficult to say the least, especially when faced with a High Tea function full of yummy cakes, sandwiches and champagne. However I did make it through the 8 week detox phase and managed to drop a few kilos in weight.

Now that I have moved through the initial detox I have gradually re-introduced foods such as rice crackers, sour dough breads, gluten-free wraps, corn tortillas and a little pasta and rice now and again. For sweet treats I buy sugar-free fruit and nut clusters, make cacao and coconut balls or have some fruit and plain yoghurt.

I am not missing the sweet things in my life that I used to enjoy at all. I have found that I am more satiated with my diet than ever before and I don’t experience the sugar highs and lows that I used to. I just don’t miss the ‘bad stuff’ at all!

So over to you readers. Do you think the ‘quit sugar’ is just another fad diet? Also do you think my cholesterol will jump through the roof?

 

 

Spread the love
By 50 Shades, September 8, 2015 Kathy was a 50 something year old when she started up this blog 6 years ago, but has since turned over another decade and is now in her early 60s. She is married with two adult children and lives on the Tweed Coast of New South Wales, Australia. Kathy enjoys living life to the fullest and loves to keep fit and active by maintaining a healthy diet and exercising regularly. Some of her interests include reading, photography, travelling, cooking and blogging! Kathy works part-time as a freelance writer but her real passion is travelling and photographing brilliant destinations both within Australia and overseas and writing about it.
  • 20

50 Shades

Kathy was a 50 something year old when she started up this blog 6 years ago, but has since turned over another decade and is now in her early 60s. She is married with two adult children and lives on the Tweed Coast of New South Wales, Australia. Kathy enjoys living life to the fullest and loves to keep fit and active by maintaining a healthy diet and exercising regularly. Some of her interests include reading, photography, travelling, cooking and blogging! Kathy works part-time as a freelance writer but her real passion is travelling and photographing brilliant destinations both within Australia and overseas and writing about it.

20 Comments
  • Lyndall from Seize the Day Project
    September 8, 2015

    I’m very impressed Kathy! I’ve cut out processed sugar, but I’m still eating fruit and having the occasional glass of wine. Am hoping for some positive results. I found my blood sugar dropped too drastically without the fruit, and I was having dizzy spells. Well done for sticking with it!

    • Kathy
      September 8, 2015

      I think the trick is to be not too pedantic about it. I still drink wine, eat sour dough bread and eat a banana now and again. If a diet feels too restrictive it is way too hard to stick to, I find. I have cut out most processed foods however and that is what I wanted to achieve. :)

  • Rae Hilhorst
    September 8, 2015

    I admire you Kathy. I have cut down though and noted that you have gluten free products. Is that for the bloating?

    • Kathy
      September 8, 2015

      Thanks Rae. I don’t whether I’m gluten or lactose intolerant, but certainly giving up most processed foods has helped me immensely with the bloating. I feel so much better for it. :)

  • Johanna
    September 8, 2015

    Well done Kathy. I admire you for sticking to it pretty stringently. I don’t think I could cut sugar out of my diet completely as I do like the occasional glass of wine, and fruit, but I think cutting down and being aware of hidden sugars is a really good thing. I get what you’re saying about cholesterol though – that could be a problem if your diet suddenly had a lot more saturated fats in it – creamy yoghurts, butter, red meat – I guess.

    • Kathy
      September 8, 2015

      Yes the high fat is a bit of a worry. I guess time will tell. I found not eating a lot of fruit a big challenge but I still get to eat some fruit with breakfast and then I snack on nuts or cheese. I think the main thing is that I have cut out the high sugary processed foods that I had been eating thinking they were healthy. It is very easy to be deceived by ‘so called’ healthy foods (that are just plied with sugar to make them taste better). :)

  • budgettraveltalk
    September 11, 2015

    I am glad you found something that works for you :) Cutting out sugar would be a biggie!

  • waexplorer
    September 12, 2015

    Well done for sticking it through. i’ve looked into the I quit Sugar programme, but didn’t go through with it. I think you’ve spurred me on to give it another go. It’s so tricky to make the right food choices. We all know that chocolate, cakes and lollies are full of sugar but we rarely question what’s hiding in ketchup, baked beans and low fat products. I think being clued on about all the hidden stuff in the food we eat is key to having a healthy diet.

    • Kathy
      September 13, 2015

      I honestly thought I was eating healthy until I saw this movie. It really shocked me as to the amount of hidden sugar in foods that are regarded as healthy. Cereals and fruit juices are the two biggies. I must admit I feel a lot better for it. :)

  • Johanna
    September 14, 2015

    I went to listen to Lee from Supercharged Foods the other night at a book event. It was interesting what she said about ‘fad’ diets and although she suggests a strict de-tox to get the stomach flora right in the beginning, she said that introducing things back into your diet so that you don’t feel deprived and eating in the 80/20 way was the most likely way to succeed in the long run.

    • Kathy
      September 14, 2015

      That is very good advice Jo. I have slowly re-introduced a lot of foods back into my diet like bread, fruit, rice and pasta (as they aren’t ‘bad’ foods – just a big high in sugar). They say everything in moderation. The good thing is that I don’t bother about low fat anything and I don’t drink diet drinks anymore. So two good things have come out of this new diet.

  • Linda ~ Journey Jottings
    September 14, 2015

    So much sugar can be eliminated from one’s diet by simply using raw ingredients and avoiding processed foods –
    The biggest increase in sugar to our diets has been, as you mention, manufacturers reducing the flavoursome fat and then having to put something back in it to make it palatable, and that something has been sugar :(
    Full fat is so much more filling you’ll most likely eat less – and I have read research suggesting it was even the sugar that caused the inflammation in the arteries that the fat went to – a bit like a band aid to cover the ‘wound’- and that calling the fat the perpetrator was a bit like calling a fireman at the scene of a fire the culprit!

    • Kathy
      September 14, 2015

      You are correct Linda. Many of the processed foods and low fat foods have a lot of sugar in them. I guess it just means cutting out those foods and eating as natural as possible. It is really interesting what you say about the full fat thing. We are all being misinformed!

  • Michele Peterson (A Taste for Travel)
    September 14, 2015

    Wow, I need a dose of your discipline and a lot fewer spoonfuls of sugar from the sounds of it! The only good thing I seem to be doing is not eating much processed food. But my weakness is definitely bread, wine and cheese. The prospect of my brain fog lifting is very appealing.

    • Kathy
      September 14, 2015

      You should watch the movie ‘That Sugar Film’. It was all I needed to give me the incentive to give up sugar. Yes I hardly eat processed foods now and I also gave up Diet Coke, which is a biggie for me! Some breads are fine, cheese is also fine and wine in moderation is ok. We can’t give up all life’s pleasures! :)

  • middleagedmama1
    September 14, 2015

    I’m a bit suspicious of it to be honest. Hubster watched a documentary on SBS recently where twin doctors trialled various diets; one of the findings was that sugar is not the evil villain it’s depicted as. Yes, too much is a bad thing but all things in moderation. The same with fats etc. I am going to have to watch it – and the sugar film – for myself I think!

    • Kathy
      September 15, 2015

      There is a lot of conflicting advice through the media so it can be confusing at times to know what to eat and not to eat. We watched a program that said bacon and ham caused cancer so stopped eating that for ages. I haven’t completely eliminated sugar from my diet I still have sugar in my coffee and I still eat fruit and drink a glass of wine. Like you say everything in moderation. :)

  • frugalfirstclasstravel
    September 18, 2015

    Great job. I gave up “diet” soft drink years ago when I found out that artificial sweeteners produce the same Insulin response as normal sugar, and it makes you hungry as a result. Do I miss it? No, not at all. Occasionally I have some, and I just can’t drink it – far too sweet and I just feel so bloated afterwards. And I’m with you on the oats – my go to breakfast every morning. In summer I make my own basic Bircher muesli with oats, yogurt and banana, and have porridge in winter

    • Kathy
      September 18, 2015

      No I don’t miss diet drinks anymore either. I drink sparkling water now and find it very refreshing. You and I sound so alike. I also make my own bircher muesli in summer with yoghurt and fruit. Full cream yoghurt that is – and it tastes divine! Thanks for dropping by my blog. :)

Comments are closed.

The Big Lap Bible
Big-Lap-Bible
Partica
Buy my articles on

Download, Edit & Post
Quality Written Articles
Motorhome Republic
Loading search form...
I Want That Flight

OUT NOW!! 50 Shades of Age eBook

Women Over 50 Blogs

Subscribe To Blog Via Email

Don't miss new posts! Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.
Instagram API currently not available.